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The Crow's Nest
Crows gather all kinds of things in their nests. They like shiny objects or whatever strikes their fancy. I, too, like to gather a variety of things, but unlike a crow, I like to share what I find, as well as what I create myself.
Billy Name, photograph of Andy Warhol with Baby Ruth inflatables. Silver Factory, 1966
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Andy Warhol, Goethe, 1981
Acrylic on canvas, 205 x 225 cm, Siegfroed Weishaupt Collection, © Artists Rights Society, New York, photo: Archive Siegfried Weishaupt Collection. Laupheim.
“The moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves as well. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favor all manner of unforeseen accidents, meetings and material assistance that no one could have dreamed would come their way. Whatever you can do or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it. Begin it now.”      -Goethe
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Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1967. Synthetic polymer and silkscreen on canvas
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Andy Warhol, Brigitte Bardot, (1974)
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Andy Warhol, Flowers
Andy Warhol’s Flowers, 1964, sold for 8,146,500 at the Contemporary Art Part I sale, 12 May 2011, New York.Andy Warhol’s Flowers, 1964 was produced during what was arguably the most significant time period of the artist’s career. Though Warhol had already experienced a great deal of success with his images of Campbell’s Soup Cans, Liz, Marilyn and Elvis, the year 1964 saw his dramatic and meteoric rise to fame. To round off an outstanding season, Leo Castelli scheduled a Warhol show to take place at his gallery from November to December of that year featuring the artist’s new Flowers paintings. The source of the image Warhol appropriated for this series first appeared in the June 1964 issue of Modern Photography, a photograph of hibiscus blossoms illustrating an article about color processing. Following the show at Castelli Gallery, critic David Bourdon described Warhol’s Flowers as “…cut out gouaches by Matisse set adrift on Monet’s lily pond” (The Village Voice, December 3, 1964). The color scheme is also highly evocative of Van Gogh’s Irises.Culling inspiration from a seemingly banal source, using a lithographic process, Warhol produced only two or three basic designs in a variety of color schemes, each in a square format. The artist found this format particularly satisfying because its regular shape allowed these paintings to be hung with any side up. As Warhol himself explained, “I like painting on a square…because you don’t have to decide whether it should be longerlonger or shorter-shorter or longer-shorter: it’s just a square” (D. Bourdon, Warhol, New York, 1989, p. 191).
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David McCabe, Salvador Dali and Andy Warhol
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